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Net Neutrality means a level playing field for everyone.

YOU CAN HELP SAVE
NET NEUTRALITY.

 

WHY NET NEUTRALITY MATTERS

In December 2017, the Federal Communications Commission decided to stop enforcing net neutrality rules. This means that your internet service provider (ISP) will be allowed to charge you different amounts based on the types of websites you look at… or restrict content they don’t want you to see.

Why does this matter?

Businesses need a neutral internet.
Almost every business today depends on broad and predictable internet access to thrive. Imagine if a business’s ISP limited file-sharing websites only to their preferred service, or limited customers’ search results only to those businesses who had paid that ISP a kickback. Businesses depend on an ability to connect with consumers, clients, vendors, and other businesses on the whole internet… not just those within their ISP’s network.

Consumers deserve choices.
Today, consumers on the internet have to navigate through a lot of paid ads when looking for a product. Even so, there is not much content (aside from blatantly illegal activities) that is expressly blocked. Ending net neutrality means that an internet service provider could decide to arbitrarily block some content based on fees paid by third-party competitors, keeping valuable information away from consumers.

A free society depends on access to information.
Oregonians should have access to ideas and information, even when it runs counter to the business interests of their internet service provider. Making choices about voting, for example, should be done with free access to information on both sides of an issue. When an internet service provider is able to decide what arguments people hear and what arguments they don’t hear, it becomes dangerously undemocratic. Without net neutrality rules, your internet service provider would be fully able to deny you access to this very website.

 

What can we do?

Even though the FCC has chosen not to enforce net neutrality, federal law allows individual states to regulate these services in order to promote quality and protect consumers.  

Oregonians for Net Neutrality has drafted a net neutrality law for Oregon. We need 88,184 signatures to get it on the ballot.  Click here to add yours!


READ THE MEASURE

Read the Oregonians for Net Neutrality measure, IP 40.  If we can get 88,184 signatures, we'll get a chance to vote on it in November 2018.

Learn More →

STAY UP TO DATE


TAKE ACTION

If you’re a registered voter in the State of Oregon, we'll need your help get net neutrality to the ballot! First, we need 1,000 signatures to get a ballot title. Then, we’ll need about 87,000 more to make it to the November 2018 ballot.

 

1. Sign the petition to protect Oregon's net neutrality. Registered voters can download an “e-sheet” petition here.  Fill out the sheet and send it to:

 

Oregonians for Net Neutrality
3040 SE McLoughlin Blvd
Portland OR 97202

 

 

2. Donate!  Anyone can make a donation to the campaign, which helps us communicate with voters and get this measure to the ballot!  (Oregonians get a yearly $50 political tax credit to use for any campaign... more information here!)  Every donation helps bring voter-approved net neutrality closer to a reality!

 

3. Join the conversation! Like our page on Facebook to stay up to date on events and join the conversation.

 

WHAT STILL NEEDS TO HAPPEN?

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Step 1: File the proposed measure with the Secretary of State.

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Step 2: Gather 1,000 signatures from registered Oregon voters!  After this step, the measure will be assigned a ballot title.  (This process may take weeks or more)

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Step 3: After being assigned a ballot title, gather another 87,184 signatures by July 6.

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Step 4: VOTE!  A simple majority at the November 2018 ballot would make net neutrality the law in Oregon. 

 

SUPPORTERS

The Oregonians for Net Neutrality team is:

 
 
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RICH BADER, TREASURER

As a 40+ year tech veteran and founder and former CEO of EasyStreet Online Services, one of Oregon’s original Internet Service Providers (ISPs), Rich has seen the impact of telecommunications policy on businesses and citizens alike. Through participation in forums such as the Oregon Telecommunications Coordinating Committee and the Software Association of Oregon, Rich has advocated for an open internet and net neutrality.

 
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THOMAS FRANK, CO-CHIEF PETITIONER

Thomas Frank has lived in West Linn with his wife since 2004. Thomas was elected to the West Linn City Council in 2012 and served until 2016. He joined the National League of Cities in 2014, where he was appointed to the Small Cities Council. He has advocated for Small Cities priorities in Congress and the White House. Also in 2014, Thomas was voted unanimously to the League of Oregon Cities Board of Directors. Thomas worked on an initiative to create a municipal fiberoptic network for West Linn, modeling it after the City of Sandy and City of Monmouth. 

 
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RACHEL NOVICK, CO-CHIEF PETITIONER

A native Oregonian, Rachel Novick has spent the last 15+ years doing two things. The first is analyzing data; the second is working for and supporting progressive politicians and causes. Rachel owns and operates Novick Analytics, which analyzes political data and builds interactive dashboards for progressive campaigns and causes so that they can be smarter, stronger, and more successful. Rachel lives in SW Portland with her husband Steve and their two corgis, Pumpkin and Barley. As a small business owner whose analytics rely on net neutrality, this issue is especially important to Rachel.

 
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CHRIS HARKER, CO-CHIEF PETITIONER

Chris was appointed to the Oregon House of Representatives in June of 2008, where he co-chaired the Joint Legislative Committee on Audits and Information Management and Technology. Chris is the Founder of Cayuse, Inc, the top provider of software for obtaining grants from the federal government, which was started in the corner of his living room while he was on the faculty at OHSU.  Chris served in the State Legislature until 2015, and now lives in Washington County.